Book Review – The Bus on Thursday by Shirley Barrett

Book Review – The Bus on Thursday by Shirley BarrettThe Bus on Thursday by Shirley Barrett
on September 18, 2018
Genres: Fiction, horror, Literary, Thrillers, Supernatural
Pages: 304
Goodreads
four-stars

Welcome to a wild ride from Shirley Barrett.

Australian Author – check

Australian setting – check

Humour – check

Creepy weird AF story – check

I got this ripper from my Street Library and I don’t regret it. The protagonist, Eleanor, tells it like it is, with all the Aussie slang and references (as well as swear words) she can muster.

Written in a blog/diary entry form, it made for an easy read that was entertaining and kooky. It might be written a little too casually for some, but I enjoyed it and felt it was refreshing to read something a little more relaxed.

I mean, it is written by one of the directors of the tv show Offspring (Australian soap) and I certainly see some similarities in that Eleanor has an internal dialouge that isn’t unlike Nina’s in Offspring. Offspring is one of my favourite tv shows…so it all makes sense.

This book might not translate very well for international readers, due to Aussie terms and references. If you can get past that and the curse words you will enjoy the humour and weirdo storyline.

I don’t think I can say that Eleanor is a particularly likeable character, but she is relatable…well…sort of, if you can see yourself making passes at your elderly doctor or discussing exorcising demons at the local church. Eleanor finds herself in some interesting situations when she gets a new teaching job in a small town – most of which are funny, strange or confusing.

There were times when I didn’t know where the story was going or if it was in fact going anywhere, but I had gotten so far in that I didn’t mind the commitment and I had invested myself to reading Eleanor’s story. Perhaps I liked her more than I’m happy to admit.

The new town is full of crazy characters and whilst Eleanor might seem like one of the ‘normal’ ones, she herself has some questionable behaviours. Actually, she fits right in.

Just when you think things couldn’t get any more quirky in this story, there is what I like to call an “Evil Dead” moment. I’ll say no more, if you’ve seen the movie you’ll likely put two and two together. I’ll just say, I enjoyed it.

If you love the weird and wonderful, interesting characters and a touch of the supernatural you will enjoy this book – just don’t expect to be given all the answers and don’t take it too seriously.

Synopsis

Bridget Jones meets The Exorcist in this wickedly funny, dark novel about one woman’s post-cancer retreat to a remote Australian town and the horrors awaiting her

It wasn’t just the bad breakup that turned Eleanor Mellett’s life upside down. It was the cancer. And all the demons that came with it.

One day she felt a bit of a bump when she was scratching her armpit at work. The next thing she knew, her breast was being dissected and removed by an inappropriately attractive doctor, and she was suddenly deluged with cupcakes, judgy support groups, and her mum knitting sweaters.

Luckily, Eleanor discovers Talbingo, a remote little town looking for a primary-school teacher. Their Miss Barker up and vanished in the night, despite being the most caring teacher ever, according to everyone. Unfortunately, Talbingo is a bit creepy. It’s not just the communion-wine-guzzling friar prone to mad rants about how cancer is caused by demons. Or the unstable, overly sensitive kids, always going on about Miss Barker and her amazing sticker system. It’s living alone in a remote cabin, with no cell or Internet service, wondering why there are so many locks on the front door and who is knocking on it late at night.

Riotously funny, deeply unsettling, and surprisingly poignant, Shirley Barrett’s The Bus on Thursday is a wickedly weird, wild ride for fans of Helen Fielding, Maria Semple, and Stephen King.

four-stars

About Shirley Barrett

Shirley Barrett is a screenwriter, film director and novelist.

She has written and directed three feature films, including Love Serenade, which won the Camera D’Or (Best First Feature) at Cannes Film Festival in 1996. She has also directed television drama, including Love My Way, Offspring and A Place to Call Home. Known for her ability to elicit strong, truthful and detailed performances in both comedy and drama, her work is also striking visually.

Shirley has written two novels: Rush Oh! (2014) and The Bus on Thursday (2018).

Book Review – I’m thinking of ending things by Iain Reid

I'm thinking of ending things by Iain Reid
Published by Simon & Schuster on 14/06/2016
Genres: horror, Psychological, Suspense, Thriller
Format: eBook
three-half-stars

Wow. What. A. Ride.

Short. Sweet. Weird. Wonderful.

I’m not sure what I think. Im not sure what I think. I’m not sure what I think. I’m not sure what I think. I’m not sure what I think. I’m not sure what I think. I’m not sure what I think. I’m not sure what I think.

he he he he he. If you’ve read this one you’ll know what I’m getting at here..

This book is quick and easy to read. I recommend you read it. You might absolutely hate it and that’s ok. The book has extremely mixed reviews and I can see why. I couldn’t even describe to my friends what the book was about. I had a feeling I knew where it was going, I’m not disappointed by the ending. I’m not sure why it is comparable to We Need to talk about Kevin – in my mind it is not. It stands alone in it’s craziness.

Almost everything is revealed at the end. It might take some googling…(admittedly, I did this) but I’m interested in people’s interpretations. The book will leave you thinking. I quite like this. I also like the book the more I think about it.

“The Girlfriend” character annoyed me a little bit. I mean, she carried on a bit. There were moments where I wanted her to shut up. She’s thinking of ending things and he…well, you’ll see…

Maybe the end was written right from the beginning.

Jake was strange from the beginning, but a little more likeable – oddly.

Sometimes a thought is closer to truth, to reality, than an action. You can say anything, you can do anything, but you can’t fake a thought.

Who will love this:

If you enjoy weird, dark, unexplainable things…you will love it. Similarly, if you aren’t concerned about evvveerrrything being obvious or explainable, you will also like it. Especially if you enjoy quick reads (this was a bonus for me). There is no way around it, the book is weird. If that’s your thang, read it.

You gonna hate it:

You will not like this book if you dislike anything indie, that leaves you questioning things. You will likely want to google it to gain a little insight, if this bothers you, it’s a pass. You will be thinking WTF early on – again, this a normal response to the situation, but if it bothers you…thank you, next.


It’s coming to Netflixxxxxxxxxx. You know how excited I am about this. I’m very interested to see how this is going to be adapted to the screen. So. I think you should read it. You might love it, you’re probably gonna hate it but I think you need to read it to see what all the fuss is about. Just remember I sent you. I’ll cop to it. It is only 241 pages of your life…

I also want to read Iain Reid’s Foe now… sucker for punishment.

I just want to add that I wrote this review in the bathtub (don’t get dirty thoughts now) – I got a bath shelf and it is ahhhhhmazing. :o)

I also have not forgotten that I promised you a self – improvement January. Don’t worry – it’s coming…after a few more dark books. Ok, it might be more of a February thing.

Synopsis

You will be scared. But you won’t know why…

I’m thinking of ending things. Once this thought arrives, it stays. It’s always there. Always.

Jake and I have a real connection, a rare and intense attachment. What has it been…a month? I’m very attracted to him. Even though he isn’t striking, not really. I’m going to meet his parents for the first time, at the same time as I’m thinking of ending things.

Jake once said, “Sometimes a thought is closer to truth, to reality, than an action. You can say anything, you can do anything, but you can’t fake a thought.”

And here’s what I’m thinking: I don’t want to be here.

I’m thinking of ending things.

Iain Reid explores the depths of the human psyche, questioning consciousness, free will, the value of relationships, fear, and the limitations of solitude. Reminiscent of José Saramago’s early work, Michel Faber’s cult classic Under the Skin, and Lionel Shriver’s We Need to Talk About Kevin, this tense and atmospheric novel will haunt you long after the last page is turned.

three-half-stars

About Iain Reid

Iain Reid is the author of two critically acclaimed, award-winning books of nonfiction. His internationally bestselling debut novel, I’m Thinking of Ending Things, has been published in more than twenty countries. Oscar-winner Charlie Kaufman is writing and directing a film based on the novel, which Reid will co-produce. His second novel, Foe, was an instant bestseller and feature film rights have been acquired by Anonymous Content, with Reid set to executive produce. Follow him on Twitter @Reid_Iain.